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Operation Aderlass: Cyclists Kristijan Koren and Borut Bozic given two-year bans

Slovenian cyclist Kristijan Koren

Kristijan Koren turned professional in 2010

Bahrain-Merida rider Kristijan Koren and sports director Borut Bozic have been given two-year bans for doping by the International Cycling Union.

The Slovenian pair were provisionally suspended in May as part of the Operation Aderlass doping inquiry.

Koren’s violations relate to 2011 and 2012 when he was with the former Liquigas team, while Bozic’s relate to 2012 while a rider with Astana.

Bozic, 39, retired in 2018 to take up a sports director role at Bahrain-Merida.

Koren, 32, joined Bahrain-Merida in 2018 and was withdrawn from this year’s Giro d’Italia after the provisional suspension was announced.

The UCI said both had been banned for the use of prohibited methods or substances “based on information received from the law enforcement authorities of Austria”.

It added both decisions can be appealed against to the relevant National Anti‐Doping Organisation and the World Anti‐Doping Agency (Wada).

The Operation Aderlass inquiry, led by Austrian authorities, is looking into blood doping, a process where athletes have blood transfusions to increase their stamina and performance, which is prohibited under Wada regulations.

Austrian cyclists Georg Preidler and Stefan Denifl admitted doping and were provisionally suspended in March, a week after five Nordic skiers were arrested, before both were subsequently banned for four years by the UCI.

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/cycling/49991591

Road World Championships: Rider in tears after being left stranded with tyre problem

Colombian rider German Dario Gomez Becerra is left in tears and stranded on the side of the road after experiencing tyre problems in the Junior Road World Championships in Yorkshire.

Watch the World Road Cycling Championships live on BBC TV and iPlayer.

Available to UK users only.

WATCH MORE: Simmons wins men’s junior road title

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/av/cycling/49850958

Watch: USA’s Megan Jastrab takes junior gold in sprint finish

Watch the USA’s Megan Jastrab win the sprint finish to take gold at the Junior Cycling World Championships in Yorkshire.

Watch the World Road Cycling Championships live on BBC TV and iPlayer.

Available to UK users only.

WATCH MORE: Junior rider in tears after being left stranded with tyre problem

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/av/cycling/49850964

Second world title would bring elation

Britain's Lizzie Deignan smiles on the podium after winning the 2019 Women's Tour

Lizzie Deignan won the 2019 Women’s Tour in June, nine months after giving birth

Lizzie Deignan says winning a second world road race championship in Yorkshire would bring “elation” rather than the “relief” of her first title.

Britain’s Deignan, 30, won road race gold in 2015 at Richmond, in the USA, after being billed as the favourite.

But having returned to cycling in April after giving birth to her daughter Orla last year, Deignan says she is not the favourite to win on Saturday.

“Winning here would be a totally different feeling,” she told BBC Sport.

“I went into Richmond in 2015 as the out-and-out favourite, I delivered and when I crossed the line it was a sense of relief.

“Physically I’m not the strongest on the start line but on my best day, with the best conditions and the best luck, I have a chance.

“To win here would be elation rather than relief.”

Deignan will lead the British team of six riders over the undulating 149.4 km course from Bradford to Harrogate, with Lizzy Banks, Alice Barnes, Hannah Barnes, Anna Henderson and Nikki Juniper the other home riders.

The Otley-born rider says her familiarity with the roads will be an advantage but has picked Dutch three-time world champion Marianne Vos, who beat Deignan to gold in the London 2012 road race, as the rider to beat.

“The course is really hard but these roads do lend themselves to my style of riding,” she said.

“The terrain is relentless and punishing and you never feel good – that’s a real advantage to understand that and know I’m never going to feel like I’ve got great legs, it’s going to be a slog from the start to the finish.

“My favourite is Marianne Vos – she’s an incredible athlete and is having a renaissance in her career at the moment and she knows how to deliver on a championship stage.”

The Netherlands appear to have the strongest team in the race, featuring the past two world road race champions – Anna van der Breggen and Chantal Blaak – and two-time world time trial champion Annemiek van Vleuten, while Deignan said that Lucinda Brand could also be “a real dark horse” for victory.

Deignan said she therefore will not seek to dictate the race but will be “following and making my moves at very specific times.”

She added she was relishing the opportunity to race a “surreal” course that passes so many places with significance to her.

“I never thought I would ride a home world championships – a home Olympics was special enough and this is a real privilege,” she said.

“The whole route is surreal – it starts in Bradford, my sister lives in Bradford, it goes through Otley, my home town, past the church I was married in, past my school, past my parents’ house and finishes where we live now and where my daughter was born.”

The elite women’s road race is set to start at 11:40 BST and finish between 15:30 and 16:00.

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The 149.5km women’s road race takes place on Saturday

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/cycling/49856508

Second world title would bring elation

Britain's Lizzie Deignan smiles on the podium after winning the 2019 Women's Tour

Lizzie Deignan won the 2019 Women’s Tour in June, nine months after giving birth

Lizzie Deignan says winning a second world road race championship in Yorkshire would bring “elation” rather than the “relief” of her first title.

Britain’s Deignan, 30, won road race gold in 2015 at Richmond, in the USA, after being billed as the favourite.

But having returned to cycling in April after giving birth to her daughter Orla last year, Deignan says she is not the favourite to win on Saturday.

“Winning here would be a totally different feeling,” she told BBC Sport.

“I went into Richmond in 2015 as the out-and-out favourite, I delivered and when I crossed the line it was a sense of relief.

“Physically I’m not the strongest on the start line but on my best day, with the best conditions and the best luck, I have a chance.

“To win here would be elation rather than relief.”

Deignan will lead the British team of six riders over the undulating 149.4 km course from Bradford to Harrogate, with Lizzy Banks, Alice Barnes, Hannah Barnes, Anna Henderson and Nikki Juniper the other home riders.

The Otley-born rider says her familiarity with the roads will be an advantage but has picked Dutch three-time world champion Marianne Vos, who beat Deignan to gold in the London 2012 road race, as the rider to beat.

“The course is really hard but these roads do lend themselves to my style of riding,” she said.

“The terrain is relentless and punishing and you never feel good – that’s a real advantage to understand that and know I’m never going to feel like I’ve got great legs, it’s going to be a slog from the start to the finish.

“My favourite is Marianne Vos – she’s an incredible athlete and is having a renaissance in her career at the moment and she knows how to deliver on a championship stage.”

The Netherlands appear to have the strongest team in the race, featuring the past two world road race champions – Anna van der Breggen and Chantal Blaak – and two-time world time trial champion Annemiek van Vleuten, while Deignan said that Lucinda Brand could also be “a real dark horse” for victory.

Deignan said she therefore will not seek to dictate the race but will be “following and making my moves at very specific times.”

She added she was relishing the opportunity to race a “surreal” course that passes so many places with significance to her.

“I never thought I would ride a home world championships – a home Olympics was special enough and this is a real privilege,” she said.

“The whole route is surreal – it starts in Bradford, my sister lives in Bradford, it goes through Otley, my home town, past the church I was married in, past my school, past my parents’ house and finishes where we live now and where my daughter was born.”

The elite women’s road race is set to start at 11:40 BST and finish between 15:30 and 16:00.

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The 149.5km women’s road race takes place on Saturday

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/cycling/49856508

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